M. Castleton’s Tin

His is the shock of being able to see into the future, seeing us gazing back at him and yet (frozen in tin) unable to engage.

We can look him over in a myriad of ways, even flip him over if we like, but M. Castleton cannot move, cannot even blink. We feel sorry for him. In a future near, our brains will be scanned in their entirety, all 100 billion neurons and 100 trillion connections, so that people in the further future (if we could recognize them as that), will be able to fully engage with our holographic avatar universe. In that sense, they will posses our "soul," our every thought and memory we one time held—yet without all the back pain, hangovers and male pattern baldness. Our "soulmind," will operate perpetually in some petri dish, on a computer chip in the extra bathroom by the foyer, or on a living room mantle next to Grandpa’s ashes—an endless tranquil think-tank, or digital HAU—caught in a familiar, infinite gaze.

This is what we see in the eyes of M. Castleton’s tin. Our children’s children will have children, and their children will feel sorry for us, up there above the mantle and caught suspended as we are, no longer evolving in perpetuity, as will be their custom. This because not soon enough in the future our avatar universe will not lie merely static, but will continue to flourish with thought and idea—in essence, will continue to “grow” mentally, forever after our corporeal existence has (or maybe hasn’t) past.

This is what we’ll see in the eyes of M. Castleton’s tin. These are the nebulous thoughts he’ll hurdle forth through time and space. His perpetual deer-in-the-headlights vogue, as he once queried into a primitive soul-catching device, a camera contraption, an early memory gatherer. M. Castleton will be grasping, in one timeless moment, as the aperture dawned and a bang of light blasted, this future was right there up in his grill—glaring him in the face.

 M. Castleton, 1896  Found tintype, 2014   M. Castleton’s Tin Digital assembly with text, 22 January, 2015  M. Castleton’s Tin is a collaboration between Jay Jurisich and  Tennyson Woodbridge  and may be reproduced in part or in full, expressly or unexpressedly,  assuming  it is credited as such...up until a period of 75 years, after which point any such credit will be strictly forbidden

M. Castleton, 1896
Found tintype, 2014

M. Castleton’s Tin
Digital assembly with text, 22 January, 2015

M. Castleton’s Tin is a collaboration between Jay Jurisich and Tennyson Woodbridge and may be reproduced in part or in full, expressly or unexpressedly, assuming it is credited as such...up until a period of 75 years, after which point any such credit will be strictly forbidden